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How to Get Results From Your Team Building Activities – Part Two

Posted by Jack Wilkinson on Wed, Aug 09, 2017 @ 08:48 AM

Team Building

You can read How to Get Results From Your Team Building Activities – Part One here.

Giving Purpose to Your Team-Building Activities
When the team members are engaged in a team building task, pay attention to the behavior of each person. What differences are at play? Has someone tried to do all the work themselves? Is anyone keeping a close eye on the time remaining to complete the task? Is someone delegating? Is anyone raising objections to what’s been proposed or what’s being done?

When the task is done, you will all have seen the different ways that each person behaved. Now it’s time to discuss those differences. Ask each team member to explain why they did what they did. Then ask them what they learned about one another. Finally, have them discuss ways in which their differences could be beneficial or harmful to their work as a team.

After you’ve talked through their behaviors and your team members better understand one another, it may be time to make some changes based on what you’ve learned. Let’s say you had someone who took it upon themselves to monitor the team’s progress with a constant eye on the clock. This person may have underutilized project management skills. Perhaps they would be good at keeping the team on track with various projects. Or suppose a member of your team displayed creative thinking and problem-solving skills you had no idea existed, perhaps because their job duties don’t typically require those skills. Consider how those skills could be used within the team. What workflows make the most sense given everyone’s strengths and weaknesses? What conflicts exist on the team? In what ways could they be resolved?

Making It a Team Effort 
The best team building, though, doesn’t come from on high. If you try to impose new workflows on a team that require them to be more collaborative, and the members of the team don’t want to collaborate more, you’ll get pushback and likely make the team function more poorly. Forced to work together more, they’ll argue more about the way they want to do things.

Before team-building efforts can be successful, the workers on a team must want those efforts to be successful. They need to be willing to disagree and debate in good faith, compromise when needed, and balance out one another’s skills. A proven way to engage employees in team building: put them in charge of it. Let them plan their team-building activities and decide how best to incorporate what they learn into their workflows. Give them the freedom to be creative and build up one another. Trust them and encourage them to trust one another. After all, team building must be a team effort.

Assessing Success
Any team-building effort requires time and resources. In other words, you’re paying for it. You therefore should be able to determine whether such efforts were worth the cost. A vague feeling of improvement is not sufficient – especially not when the fruits of team building can be measured. Before, during, and after team-building activities, you should be recording and analyzing metrics pertaining to team efficiency and productivity. Did the team meet its goals? Look at the key performance indicators that make sense for your team. Production, morale, and retention are good figures to examine. Definitely measure whether the team has been able to get more work done in less time.

Keep an eye on the numbers, account for other variables, and be willing to try new team-building activities or rethink your team-building strategy.

Making it Happen
Before you get started, remember that you’re not just building any team, but the team you have. Your goal is to help the people on this team understand one another better so they’ll be better able to collaborate. So, begin by considering what you already know about your team and brainstorming activities that will require their collaboration, communication, and compromise. When they do these activities, observe their behavior and discuss it with them afterwards. If you learn anything that could improve the team’s workflow, consider giving it a try, and then pay attention to the team’s performance metrics in the weeks that follow.

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